Dial M for Murder is one of my favorite Hitchcock’s movies. With a great cast consisting Grace Kelley, Ray Milland, and Robert Cummings. John Williams also stars as the chief inspector who

The opening credit music lulls you into a false sense of security. But it does not take long for a dark thread to become visible.

The scene is quite chilling as Tony tells his friend, Lesgate, one evening about how he found out about the affair and how he thought about killing her.  When Margot and Mark seemed to break it off, Tony gives the marriage another chance. But when the couple make out their wills and leave their possessions to each other, he changes his mind. He then reveals his plan to Lesgate and subsequently talks him into murdering Margot. The fact that he is blackmailing Lesgate makes the task easy.

There is no music during the scene in which Lesgate and Tony discuss their plans, but the music kicks in the moment Lesgate picks up the money Tony offered him and in essence commits to his part in the murderous plot.

Hitch inserts a little comedy into the following scene. Tony, Margot, and Mark are sitting around drinking before the men are to go out to a stag party. They are discussing if the “perfect murder” is possible. Soon after, Tony asks Margot for her key and sets his plan into motion.

But the night of the planned murder, things do not go as Tony had intended. Margot kills her attacker (Lesgate) instead. Tony at first scrambles, but then quickly sees a way to still get what he wants. He sets up Margot, making her look like she had a motive to kill Lesgate.

Tony evolves with his plan, but has a big slip-up in the end. The Chief Inspector is just as clever as Tony. He catches Tony red-handed and proves Margot’s innocence all in the same moment.

Hitch does a great job in playing out the key scenes. Each has the right amount of feeling, whether the scene needed suspense, chill, or uneasy laughter, such as the end of the Tony/Lesgate scene. Tony is almost comical in the way he calmly goes about the room wiping off Lesgate’s fingerprints while Lesgate looks on bewildered.

The way the camera zooms in on key props such as the house keys and even the telephone dialer is classic Hitch.

Milland gives a great performance as the diabolical husband. This Hitch thriller is a classic that can be enjoyed today even in comparison to many of today’s great mysteries.

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